ARH Sub-Working Group

Priority objectives for 2016-2017:

  • Engage adolescents to build their capacity around how to develop and implement quality programs and work with working group members to enhance adolescent-inclusive collaboration and partnerships for advocacy, programming, M&E, and research.
  • Build adolescent sexual and reproductive health (ASRH) capacity through developing master trainers for ASRH, and sharing information on upcoming trainings, existing tools, and good practices.
  • Advocate and integrate ASRH into IAWG work, such as the IAFM revision; MISP, family planning, and safe-abortion care SWGs; across clusters/sectors; and discussions with development actors.

Adolescent reproductive health:

  • Advocate for quality adolescent SRH programming in humanitarian settings.
    • February 2016 Status:
      • Child Fund has actively reached out to its senior management team and emergencies unit to integrate SRH as a core component within protection.
      • ARH SWG is developing a fact sheet on ASRH programming in humanitarian settings.
      • International Planned Parenthood Federation – Sexual and Reproductive Health Program in Crisis and Post-Crisis Settings (IPPF-SPRINT) recognizes the importance of adolescent and youth trainings in emergencies. Hence, in post-Earthquake Nepal, IPPF-SPRINT included several youth volunteers during MISP trainings to build their capacity for MISP delivery and SRH programming.
  • 2016 Recommendations:
    • SWG facilitators to expand membership by focusing on adolescent participation.
    • SWG facilitators to work more closely with the IAWG SWGs (such as the MISP and Voluntary Contraception (VP)) via global evaluation advocacy.
    • SWG to finalize fact sheet and provide ASRH-related facts/statistics for the IAWG website.
    • An inter-agency youth development SWG is co-chaired by the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNFPA. The IAWG ARH SWG can reach out for messaging around humanitarian settings.
    • Advocate for ASRH to be part of SRH in developing protocols for emergency preparedness.
    • Work on a bottom-up approach to advocacy to spark adolescents to initiate campaigns around ASRH and ensure sustainable advocacy at the national level.
  • Build manager, provider, community leader, and others’ capacity to facilitate their recognition of and champion for ASRH within their areas of work.
    • February 2016 Status:
      • In collaboration with the VC SWG, the ARH SWG trained youth at the International Conference on Family Planning (ICFP) to enact scenarios around barriers to accessing family planning in crisis-settings.
      • ARH SWG is developing a ToR for a roving ASRH trainer to institutionalize ASRH capacity.
      • CARE has actively reached out to senior leadership and received commitment to integrate adolescent and youth work within the agency.
      • WHO is drafting pre-service training guidelines on working with young clients.
      • UNFPA Indonesia translated ASRH toolkit into Bahasa Indonesia. UNFPA has translated the ASRH Toolkit in Arabic that is currently only available in soft copy.
      • Save the Children conducted an ASRH Toolkit training in the Philippines, Kenya, Somalia, Lebanon, and DRC.
      • International medical Corps (IMC) has formed an internal adolescent health taskforce and developed a multi-sectoral ToR to support integrated adolescent-friendly programming and utilize gender-based violence (GBV), Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Humanitarian Emergencies (MHPSS), and water and sanitation for health (WASH) sectors as entry-points for ASRH interventions.
      • IMC in collaboration with UNFPA has conducted a Training of Trainers on ASRH in emergencies for humanitarian actors from several states in South Sudan.
      • Child Fund has developed a Community of Practice, in which program directors and youth specialists in Asia receive support on ASRH integration and commit ASRH line items within their annual operating plans and budgets. Training will be held in spring 2015.
      • IPPF, through the SPRINT Initiative has been able to engage and reach out to young volunteers through various emergency responses globally.
    • 2016 Recommendations:
      • Fundraise for ARH SWG’s roving trainer position for a master trainer for ASRH.
      • ARH SWG members to initiate annual monitoring of adolescent-friendliness in their SRH programs, to monitor change and gather information for advocacy and fundraising.
      • UNFPA/Save the Children to continue disseminating and translating the ASRH Toolkit.
      • Hold regional trainings for development agencies/practitioners.
      • Foster mentorship, on-the-job trainings, or field exchanges for junior ASRH staff.
      • Compile Global Young ASRH Trainers/Youth leaders for technical assistance.
      • Share details of events on ASRH across the globe.
  • Increase programs that address ASRH in humanitarian settings.
    • February 2016 Status:
      • Youth programming in the Syrian crisis by Save the Children, IMC, and others.
      • Child Fund supports the ASRH program in response to Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, as well as child protection integration, which integrates ASRH in the Ebola response for Liberia.
      • WRC, Johns Hopkins University, Save the Children, IMC, International Rescue Committee (IRC), and Kachin Development Group (KDG) are piloting projects to prevent and respond to early marriage in Burma, Ethiopia, and Lebanon.
      • IMC is implementing a comprehensive ASRH program to improve access to and utilization of SRH information and services in Nepal. IMC is also piloting the recently developed national curriculum on Menstrual Hygiene Management in schools in the same district.
    • 2016 Recommendations:
      • Advocate with IAWG SWGs and cluster/sectors per the first objective: “Advocate for quality adolescent SRH programming in humanitarian settings.”
      • Service delivery agencies to continue to increase adolescent-friendly SRH programs.
      • Develop set of core competencies for ASRH practitioners.
      • Develop ASRH integration priorities, inclusive of engagement with other sectors.
  • Document and share best practices and lessons learned in addressing adolescents in humanitarian settings. Post documents and lessons learned on ARH SWG list at IAWG.
    • February 2016 Status:
      • UNFPA is undertaking a review of its country programs for good practices around safe spaces, mobile clinics, and peer education. It is developing a guidance note from findings.
      • With Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) funding, the WRC, Johns Hopkins University (JHU), IMC, Save the Children, and KDG are documenting learning based on secondary analysis from action-oriented research on needs of very young adolescents in Ethiopia, Lebanon, and Thailand.
      • ARH SWG is conducting a systematic literature review of good practices in ARH programming to directly inform the revision process of the ARH chapter of the IAFM.
      • As part of the Typhoon Yolanda Response, IMC implemented a Safe Motherhood Program for girls under 19 years and will be documenting best practices for ensuring adolescent-friendly services, as well as improving outcomes for high risk teenage pregnancies.
      • IMC has evaluated an ASRH project in Gondar, Ethiopia that supports a long-dormant youth center through health education, life skills enhancement, alternative basic education, recreational activities, promotion of mental health and psychosocial well-being, peer counseling, and referral to IMC strengthened adolescent-friendly SRH services.
      • During IPPF-SPRINT’s Nepal earthquake and flood response in Bangladesh, youth served as tremendous resources when engaged through distribution of SRH kits.
    • 2016 Recommendations:
      • Update ARH chapter and ensure integration of ASRH issues in other IAFM chapters.
      • SWG facilitators to allocate a time during calls for members to share best practices and challenges for adaptations to working papers, proposals, advocacy, etc.
      • Continue to review relevant humanitarian appeals to assess inclusion of adolescents, estimate budget requirements and mobilize funding on adolescent issues.
  • Support research studies on adolescent SRH.
    • February 2016 Status:
      • The WRC, JHU, IMC, IRC, and KDG are piloting prevention and response strategies to early marriage in Ethiopia, Lebanon, and Thailand.
      • JHU, Save the Children, and UNHCR are examining measurement for unaccompanied children.
      • Child Fund is examining lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning, and intersex (LGBTQI)’s GBV experiences in the Philippines; youth-led research.
    • 2016 Recommendations: Conduct practical operations research to show the effectiveness of specific strategies and process evaluations to document ASRH good practices in crisis settings.
      • Ongoing list of research ideas:
        • Examination of unique SRH needs and outreach strategies for at-risk sub-groups, including married adolescents, very young adolescents, girl mothers, adolescent heads of households, male adolescents, LGBTI adolescents, and adolescents with disabilities. How to make peer education programs effective in humanitarian settings.
        • Compile and evaluate fundraising strategies used across the globe by youth led organizations and capacity building efforts for resource mobilization.
        • Asses the global scenario on ARH funding, particularly in emergency-settings.
        • How to advocate and provide long-term family planning methods to adolescents.
        • Holistic, multi-sectoral models for health, protection, education, water and sanitation, and livelihoods that impact ASRH outcomes at the population level.
        • ASRH program models across relief through development, including preparedness.