MISP Sub-Working Group

Proposed priorities for 2016-2017:

  • Advance discussion on programming around a smooth and effective transition from MISP to Comprehensive Reproductive Health (CRH) including a “Preparedness Lens.”
  • Engage in global advocacy platforms.
  • Contribute to the revision process of the Inter-Agency Field Manual (IAFM) on Reproductive Health (RH) in Humanitarian Settings.
  • Include and develop a donor base for mobilizing resources.

 

Advocacy:

  • Continue outreach to identify new members to engage with IAWG.
    • 2015 Status: With plans to identify new members from donors and stakeholders, including European donors, ICRC, IFRC, UN agencies, World Bank, medical societies, and governments, the IAWG secretariat has managed to re-engage existing members through its formalized structure.
    • 2016 Recommendations: Ongoing; IAWG members will continue recruiting new strategic members for advocacy, research, and service delivery. Development agencies can further be engaged through dialogue around the MISP and emergency and disaster risk management for health (EDRM-H).

 

Minimum Initial Service Package:

  • Improve the MISP response in real-time emergencies, with the IAWG Surge Capacity and United Nations (UN) agencies fielding RH coordinators, and the MISP sub-working group (SWG) holding teleconferences to share information, coordinate activities, and identify gaps.
  • Provide headquarters and regional IAWG groups with support for a MISP response in real-time emergencies.
    • 2015 Status: The IAWG regional SWGs are being reinvigorated, especially with efforts led by the Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA) region that has conducted emergency preparedness assessments for the MISP in 18 countries.
    • 2015 Status: The IAWG Steering Committee has released statements in select emergencies, including the Ebola response.
    • 2015 Status: UNFPA operates an IAWG sexual and reproductive health (SRH) surge capacity roster to deploy SRH coordinators in major crises.
    • 2016 Recommendation: MISP SWG members will take part in the IAFM revision process.
  • Facilitate MISP coordination at the field level.
    • 2015 Status: With updates to the IAWG website, a who is doing what where (WWW) mapping for SRH will include basic information, including: 1) if an SRH lead has been identified; 2) if a coordinating agency has been identified; 3) if a SRH working group (WG)has  been activated; and 4) contact information. This activity continues to be tabled.
    • 2015 Status: SRH logistics and the supply chain (SRH Kits; transition to comprehensive SRH; and chronic supply shortages) have been identified as a critical gap. The IAWG has a logistics SWG that conducted an online survey to identify gaps, as well as key informant interviews (KIIs).
    • 2016 Recommendations: The MISP SWG will continue to support headquarters (HQ) and field-level coordination.
  • Advocate for better cross-sectoral/cluster preparedness and response on the MISP/CRH.
    • 2015 Status: The International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (ISDR) SRH working group has developed a policy brief and national-level monitoring tool for field-testing. The EECA region has applied a detailed SRH preparedness tool to identify MISP needs, gaps and successes, and the Women’s Refugee Commission (WRC) will be releasing a good practice case study report on integrating SRH into EDRM-H at multiple levels.
    • 2016 Recommendation: Field-test national monitoring tool.
  • Continue development of tools in support of MISP implementation and monitoring efforts.
    • MISP Monitoring and Evaluation Tool
      • 2015 Status: CDC, Boston University, UNFPA, and WRC tested the MISP assessment tools in Nepal, and are finalizing the package that includes data collection and analysis tools for focus group discussions (FGDs), KIIs, literature reviews, and facility assessments.
      • 2015 Status: The IAWG Training Partnership has been re-established, focusing on the finalization and rollout of three clinical training modules on manual vacuum aspiration (MVA), vacuum extraction, and clinical management of rape survivors.
      • 2016 Recommendation: MISP SWG will liaise closely with the IAWG Training Partnership Initiative, safe abortion care (SAC) SWG, among other SWGs to address specific gaps.
  • User-friendly tools on the MISP, written with less jargon and for clinical professionals
  • 2015 Status: The WRC/Reproductive Health Response in Crises (RHRC)’s “universal” adaptable information, education, and communication (IEC) templates on specific objectives of the MISP, as well as PATH’s job aids on clinical management of rape survivors and other themes are available on the IAWG website.
  • 2016 Recommendation: Further disseminate existing tools on the IAWG website and through the listserv.
  • Build capacity of SRH coordinators and relevant actors to facilitate MISP implementation.
    • Develop a database on available SRH personnel to be deployed in emergencies by consolidating existing databases (Columbia University, Norwegian Refugee Council, Danish Refugee Council, and determining where the list will be housed.
      • 2015 Status: United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), through IAWG, manages the SRH surge capacity initiative. IAWG has also re-established the Training Partnership Initiative.
    • Identify a core set of training materials to support clinical training of field-based SRH coordinators and clinicians, in addition to humanitarian coordinators.
      • 2015 Status: The IAWG Training Partnership Initiative has finalized clinical modules on MVA, vacuum extraction, and clinical management of rape survivors and is rolling out trainings in three training institutions in the global South.
      • 2016 Status: The IAWG Training Partnership Initiative to add a family planning module and finalize the modules on basic emergency obstetric care (EmOC) and signal functions.
    • Certify humanitarian actors, policy makers and donors in the MISP module. IAWG members are encouraged to incorporate the MISP module into their orientation package for all new health staff and to advocate internally for staff certification.
    • 2015 Status: The MISP module continues to be widely disseminated and incorporated into training curricula. Collectively, more than 5,600 people are currently certified in the original and revised modules.
    • 2016 Recommendation: Continue module dissemination; the IAWG to maintain a list of upcoming national, regional, and global trainings on the MISP.
  • Participate in IAWG opportunities to discuss uses for new and underutilized SRH technologies that facilitate effective MISP implementation.
    • Take part in the SRH Kit review processes as they occur to ensure new and underutilized SRH technologies are included in Inter-agency SRH Kits.
      • 2015 Status: See “Facilitate MISP coordination at the field level” on the work of the IAWG logistics SWG.
  • Include and develop donor base for mobilizing resources.
    • A donor network/ profiling to be done for Humanitarian Emergencies.
      • 2016 Status: The aim of this group would be:
        • How can it be ensured that SRH implementation in crises is better prioritized by donors, and therefore, better funded?
        • How can it be ensured that donors are knowledgeable about the importance of rapid implementation of SRH services during an emergency response i.e. that SRH services are lifesaving services and not a luxury?
          • The development banks such as World Bank and Asian Development Bank to be included since they have Climate Change portfolios, under which they fund various organizations.
      • 2016 Recommendation: Develop a Donor Working Group under the IAWG. This will include the development of an IAWG donor strategy.